These images were comissioned by the Time Art Gallery team in Bluewater Shopping Centre in Greenhithe, Kent, UK. The images are of places of interest and attractions located in the local South and South East counties surrounding Bluewater.

Beachy head lighthouse
Beachy Head Lighthouse
An infamous coastal attraction on Englands South coast. Many people make the hazardous trip along the cliffs to see the famous red and white Beachy Head lighthouse, which began warning sailors of ships in 1902. The walk along the cliffs of Beachy head is hazardous because of the sheer drop down to rocks below, landslips and the fact, there is hardly any fencing. This image was taken in high summer in 2012. It was captured on the same day as Beachy Head which gives a different angle of the lighthouse and is also in black and white as opposed to full colour. Beachy Head lighthouse would make for a great talking piece for most rooms. The arty colours are bright and vibrant which are classic of seaside towns and their promenades in the UK.
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the dartford bridge
Dartford Bridge
The Dartford Bridge also known as the QE2 is a crossing between Kent and Essex on the M25 motorway. Thousands of drivers navigate the bridge every year, which spans The River Thames, on the way into Kent from Essex (going into Essex, drivers pass through two tunnels underneath the river). The bridge was opened in 1991 by Queen Elizabeth the Second, a title which earnt the bridge the shortened nickname of the QE2. However many locals simply refer to it as either the crossing, or the bridge. The Dartford Bridge image would be a cool addition to a teens bedroom or in modern kitchen. It looks particularly effective in acrylic or as a mounted framed print. The structure of the Dartford Bridge is much clearer when viewed in greyscale as opposed to colour as it makes you focus without having the distraction of colours. The bridge is very easy on the eye thanks to its thick steel cables and tall supports.  
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Eastbourne Pier
Eastbourne Pier
Eastbourne Pier, captured in early summer, 2014. Unfortunately about a month after this image was taken the pier was partially destroyed by a fire that broke out in one of its main buildings. Eastbourne pier  is around 1,000 feet in length (300m), it was opened to the public on 13th June 1870 by Lord Edward Cavendish. People can enjoy walking or sitting in the deckchairs on the pier looking along the promenade along to Beachy Head to the West of it. This image captures one of the glorious summer days England can offer on its famous seaside towns. The empty deckchairs serve as an invitation for the viewer to engage in this image, hopefully evoking memories or feelings of wanting to visit the area. The seagulls add a hint of comedy into the image, whether you like them or not they have become a big part of UK seasides.  
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five arches footscray
Five Arches Footscray
Five Arches Footscray is a well known bridge the spans the River Cray. It is located in Footscray Meadows which sits on the outskirts of Bexley and Sidcup in the county of Kent. The Five Arches bridge was built in the 18th Century together with an almshouse adjacent to woods, which has since been excavated by archaeologists of Bexley. The bridge itself underwent renovation with new stones and while isn't wholly original, is still regarded as the Five Arches Footscray and proudly stands strong allowing dogs and their owners, walkers school children and the occasional horse and rider to cross over the river with ease. The image itself of the Five Arches has a unknown mystery surrounding it. Perhaps the saturated greens of the overhanging willow tree, or the way in which the flow of the river has been captured. Maybe it is the breaks in the dark clouds that allows blocks of sunlight through or the bold yellow tones of the bridge. Whichever element lends itself to this mystery will certainly attract viewers who come across the image.
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oast houses
Oast Houses
This image captures some few remaining last houses in Kent. Kent is often associated with last houses and used to be home to quite a few. Oast houses were designed and used to kiln (dry) hops that were grown in fields in the county. They were two or three storeys high and had a kiln or fire located on the ground floor. The hops would get laid out on the above floors and dried out through the rising heat from the kiln. The Oast houses as seen in this image, were captured on a day that you would imagine to see last houses and surrounded by wheat fields. Complete with church spire this is a stereotypical image that you may imagine when thinking of the English/Kent countryside. Most last houses are no longer around due to being old and into disrepair so were demolished, although some still remain and have been converted into liveable housing.    
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Reculver Towers
Reculver Towers
Reculver Towers is located on the South East Kent coast of England. It was built as an impressive monastery and uncommonly known as St. Mary's Church. The Church itself was situated on remains of a Roman fort which can still be made out. It was almost demolished due partly to coastal erosion. The towers were left and preserved as a beacon for ships when coming into local harbours. It is also visible along the coastline for many miles and is a landmark many cyclists head to when using the famous Viking Coastal Trail which is over 15 miles in length. The Reculver Towers have an original shape that is unlike anything else in the UK especially in the surrounding area, so it makes sense that the viewer doesn't need to see details or textures on its walls. The fact the towers simple shape is in silhouette should echo to the viewer it is an icon in the area and can be recognised just by this.
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